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Welcome to the Third-Reich-Posters website where you will find an unrivalled selection of hard to find items.

The name is historical and goes back to when we solely sold posters relating to the Third Reich Era.

We have since developed way beyond this due to the expectations, needs and requests from our varied and worldwide customer base. The price of original period pieces is prohibitively expensive and the requirements for careful storage of them often mean they are unable to be displayed and that is where we are able to help with faithful reproductions or period pieces.

Our customer base includes, museums, military establishments, veterans, T.V prop departments, university libraries and private collectors who are looking for some extra context to add to their collection.

Our wide range of translated books gives the reader an insight into how and why the Third Reich was established and why things happened as they did.

Why do we sell Third Reich related items ? Well one major factor is that their is less competition. As sites such as Amazon and E Bay have banned such items from sale it has not lessened the demand for them and indeed it can be said by banning them they have made them more desirable and have created a larger cross section of interest in this specialist niche in the marketplace. The inability to purchase on these platforms has meant that people and institutions now come to us for these items. None of these items are intended, and nor do, they incite any form  of "hate" , "intolerance" or "violence". They are meant for academic and historical  study and if abused then that is due to the interpretation of the individual not the contents of the book. If you want to blame books and ban them from sale  then you had better start by banning the Tora, Koran and Bible all of whom have passages which could be said to incite hatred, misogyny, or intolerance in one form or another.

We do offer for sale a selection of Allied posters but as these are readily available elsewhere we do not see much demand for them, but we do still offer them for sale in the interests of diversity of opinion and balance. We did however have to stop selling the Churchill busts as in 5 years we sold 1 compared to over 100 comparable sized busts of Adolf Hitler, we do not stock what people do not wish to purchase.

We advance no political agenda other than freedom of thought and expression. If you dislike what we sell then feel free to take your business and political ideology, whether Red or Brown, elsewhere.

The history of, and leading up to, WW2 is forever and can not be denied. It is not yours, or ours, to erase, rewrite, tear down or deny !

The society we have today is the child of the past and it is what it is so act accordingly.

Germania From Family to Reich

£8.99

Translated from the Third Reich original. Brief portrayal of the evolution from prehistory onward of the Germanic social structure. Includes: family, clan, tribe, province, empire, role of women, foreigner, servant, freeman, noble, king.

Just as father and mother are bound in the family, so do they belong close together as house-master and house-mistress in the management of the estate. That, too, is already Indo-Germanic legacy, as the naming among the various individual Indo-Germanic folks makes recognizable. From this, the position of honor of the married woman is especially clear. Subordinate to her were the children and the domestic servants; often she will have managed the whole farmstead, when the husband at the Thing assembly was absent for days or even away at war. What did such a Germanic family look like? Among us today in metropolitan conditions, it is, after all, so that the son makes himself independent as soon as possible and starts his own household. We want such a kind of family that consists of parents and children, called, in short, a “small-family” [“Kleinfamilie’]. Aside from that, however, there existed a family long past down in peasant conditions and that goes back to indo-Germanic prehistory, in which even the married sons, leastwise some of them, still remained in the farmstead and who were all subservient to the house-father and house-master. That is the “large-family” [Grossfamilie]. It is informative that precisely the oldest ancient Germanic kinship names that have been passed down in the Germanic vocabulary extent to the large-family. They extend from the grandparents to the grandchildren. The names are still familiar to us today, even though some are only seldom applied with the fine differentiation that one observed earlier (See “Oheim” – Nephew.) In the present language form, let us here mention: “Ahn” (grandfather), “Ahne (grandmother), father, mother, brother, sister, son, daughter, “Schnur” (daughter-in-law), “Schwäger” (wife’s father-in-law), “Schwieger” (wife’s mother-in-law), grandchild. Our old German word for son-in-law, “Eidam”, is more recent than those other examples and no longer ancient Germanic, rather a special construction of Western Germanic man. Living together, these degrees of kinship had to be carefully kept apart. In the large-family, the oldest male, hence the father or grandfather, was the chief of the whole family, the mother or grandmother his right hand. The cohesion of such a family with various married couples naturally required a good measure of prestige, dignity and power, and so it comes about that, for example, among the Indo-Germanic Greeks, the word for house-master has finally become the term for self-master: “Despot” originally meant, as linguistics teaches, nothing other than house-master. The farmstead hence had to correspondingly provide the possibility for the lodging of numerous family members and also domestic servants. But domestic servants unrelated to the family did not play a significant role with the free peasant who possessed a farmstead of common size. Generally, the family members served the house-master. Accordingly, it was not a disgrace to, say, work on the farm of the older brother, conditions that we sometimes still encounter even today. A large family, at any rate, was necessary for the farmstead and the clan. In this connection, we must again speak about the Germanic marriage. Under these orderly agrarian conditions, there was naturally only room for monogamy. Polygamy, as Tacitus relates, existed among rulers, who took a second wife for political reasons in order to establish friendly ties with other folks. Symptoms of the decay of marriage may be noted later here and there in times of turmoil. But the peasant family remained healthy in marriage, too, with its passed down traditions valid to this day.

6 in stock (can be backordered)

Description

Translated from the Third Reich original. Brief portrayal of the evolution from prehistory onward of the Germanic social structure. Includes: family, clan, tribe, province, empire, role of women, foreigner, servant, freeman, noble, king.

Just as father and mother are bound in the family, so do they belong close together as house-master and house-mistress in the management of the estate. That, too, is already Indo-Germanic legacy, as the naming among the various individual Indo-Germanic folks makes recognizable. From this, the position of honor of the married woman is especially clear. Subordinate to her were the children and the domestic servants; often she will have managed the whole farmstead, when the husband at the Thing assembly was absent for days or even away at war. What did such a Germanic family look like? Among us today in metropolitan conditions, it is, after all, so that the son makes himself independent as soon as possible and starts his own household. We want such a kind of family that consists of parents and children, called, in short, a “small-family” [“Kleinfamilie’]. Aside from that, however, there existed a family long past down in peasant conditions and that goes back to indo-Germanic prehistory, in which even the married sons, leastwise some of them, still remained in the farmstead and who were all subservient to the house-father and house-master. That is the “large-family” [Grossfamilie]. It is informative that precisely the oldest ancient Germanic kinship names that have been passed down in the Germanic vocabulary extent to the large-family. They extend from the grandparents to the grandchildren. The names are still familiar to us today, even though some are only seldom applied with the fine differentiation that one observed earlier (See “Oheim” – Nephew.) In the present language form, let us here mention: “Ahn” (grandfather), “Ahne (grandmother), father, mother, brother, sister, son, daughter, “Schnur” (daughter-in-law), “Schwäger” (wife’s father-in-law), “Schwieger” (wife’s mother-in-law), grandchild. Our old German word for son-in-law, “Eidam”, is more recent than those other examples and no longer ancient Germanic, rather a special construction of Western Germanic man. Living together, these degrees of kinship had to be carefully kept apart. In the large-family, the oldest male, hence the father or grandfather, was the chief of the whole family, the mother or grandmother his right hand. The cohesion of such a family with various married couples naturally required a good measure of prestige, dignity and power, and so it comes about that, for example, among the Indo-Germanic Greeks, the word for house-master has finally become the term for self-master: “Despot” originally meant, as linguistics teaches, nothing other than house-master. The farmstead hence had to correspondingly provide the possibility for the lodging of numerous family members and also domestic servants. But domestic servants unrelated to the family did not play a significant role with the free peasant who possessed a farmstead of common size. Generally, the family members served the house-master. Accordingly, it was not a disgrace to, say, work on the farm of the older brother, conditions that we sometimes still encounter even today. A large family, at any rate, was necessary for the farmstead and the clan. In this connection, we must again speak about the Germanic marriage. Under these orderly agrarian conditions, there was naturally only room for monogamy. Polygamy, as Tacitus relates, existed among rulers, who took a second wife for political reasons in order to establish friendly ties with other folks. Symptoms of the decay of marriage may be noted later here and there in times of turmoil. But the peasant family remained healthy in marriage, too, with its passed down traditions valid to this day.

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